Top Shelf Book Reviews

Tuck Everlasting Book Review – Top Shelf Book Reviews #7

Hello there you PermaBound books! It’s time for another book review! This week, I’ll be reviewing Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt.

I first found this book in 4th Grade, when my teacher read it to the class over the course of a couple weeks. I remember being fascinated by the idea of immortality and wondering whether or not it was worth it. One day, after we read the book, during class, my teacher asked everyone if they would rather live forever or die right there and then. Everyone in class except one person said they would rather die right now. If I was going to have to be immortal, I would want to be in my twenties. I still don’t want to be immortal though.

Enough rambling, on to the review part of the review. Lately, i’ve been reading a lot of books for this series, and by far, this one does the best with creative imagery. While it does get a tad excessive at times, it’s better to have too much description than not enough. For example, read the first paragraph…

The first week of August hangs at the very top of summer, the top of the live-long year, like the highest seat
of a Ferris wheel when it pauses in its turning. The weeks that come before are only a climb from balmy
spring, and those that follow a drop to the chill of autumn, but the first week of August is motionless, and hot.
It is curiously silent, too, with blank white dawns and glaring noons, and sunsets smeared with too much
color. Often at night there is lightning, but it quivers all alone. There is no thunder, no relieving rain. These
are strange and breathless days, the dog days, when people are led to do things they are sure to be sorry for
after.

Babbitt certainly has a way with words.

I can’t complain about the characters, as they all work well for the story regardless of being archetypes. The characters certainly work well with the story, with all the Tucks having their own distinct take on the immortality, which makes their actions interesting.

I would also like to bring up that this book was set in 1880 and still appeals to readers in 2017. That’s quite an impressive feat. I didn’t even know it was set in the 1800’s until the very end of the book, I thought maybe it was early to mid-1900’s.

That’s about all I have to say on the subject of Tuck Everlasting, but before you click away, let me ask you one question. Would you rather live forever or die right now?

Thanks for reading all the way down to the bottom of this post, I hope you liked it!

Hint for Next Review: A group of kids living in a movie theater.

Baiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii

7 thoughts on “Tuck Everlasting Book Review – Top Shelf Book Reviews #7

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